Japanese cherry blossoms make early appearance: Extreme weather to blame

Japanese cherry blossoms make early appearance: Extreme weather to blame

By Georgina Wade

The annual cherry blossom bloom in Japan signals the arrival of spring. Typically occurring in early April, the event brings flocks of tourist to the region looking to experience the floral embodiment of Japan’s most deep-rooted cultural and philosophical beliefs. But never has there been a widespread cherry blossom show put on in the fall – until now. Weathernews received more than 350 reports of early blossoms.

But, what is causing this premature fall bloom? According to the Hiroyuki Wada, an arborist with the Flower Association of Japan, cherry blossom buds develop during summer but usually don’t bloom until because of a plant hormone the leaves release to slow plant growth in preparation for the winter. However, Japan was hit by both Typhoon Jebi and Typhoon Trami in September, which carried powerful winds and salty seawater, forcing trees to shed leaves before the hormone could be released, and with the additional warm air from the South, the trees were ‘tricked’ to blossom.

Category 5 Typhoon Jebi was the strongest storm to hit Japan since 1993, killing 17 people with insured losses estimated at between 2.3 and 4.5 billion USD. A few weeks later, Typhoon Trami followed suit leaving dozens injured and hundreds of thousands of homes without power. Warm air brought about by the typhoons was quickly masked by cooler conditions during the storms’ aftermath, prompting a combination of changeable weather that mimicked spring.

Although it’s clear that this year’s storm season is to blame, the premature cherry blossoming trend has been ongoing for some time. For over 1,000 years, the flowering of Japan’s cherry trees has been chronicled in the city of Kyoto. But bloom dates have shifted radically earlier in recent decades, signalling that the region is warming.

Yasuyuki Ano, a professor of environmental sciences at Osaka Prefecture University, assembled a data set that compiles blossom-flowering dates in Kyoto starting from 800 A.D. Prior to 1850, flowering dates were fairly stable.

But from 1850 to present day, the flowering period has only surged forward at the rate of about one week per century. With warmer March temperatures typically signifying an earlier bloom, scientists believe the earlier bloom dates are directly linked with rising regional temperatures. Both Kyoto’s cherry tree flowering and temperature data suggest that its climate is the warmest it has been in at least a millennium.

The buds that opened now will not be blossoming again in coming spring. Despite this early blooming, experts do not believe this event will disrupt the timing or magnificence of the bloom next spring.


Cover photo by Sora Sagano on Unsplash.

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