Category: Latest News

December on the Acclimatise Network: Climate change – The grinch that stole Christmas

December on the Acclimatise Network: Climate change – The grinch that stole Christmas

Climate change is a well-known buzzkill and as such it also leaves its mark on what is for many is the most wonderful time of the year. This month, we will explore some of the Christmas and holiday staples that climate change is already affecting or will soon affect. From our favourite chocolates and spices, to Christmas trees, the North Pole, presents, and snow – we will take a close look at all of them and find out why climate change is the ultimate grinch.

In the meantime we leave you with these slightly depressing but still surprisingly cheerful climate change inspired Christmas carols.


Cover photo by Erika Wittlieb/Pixabay (public domain).
5th InterMET Asia Conference for Meteorology, Hydrology and Climate Services

5th InterMET Asia Conference for Meteorology, Hydrology and Climate Services

The 5th InterMET Asia International Exhibition & Conference for Meteorology, Hydrology and Climate Services will take place in Singapore on 10-13 April 2018.

InterMET Asia 2018 is a unique marketplace bringing together the global weather and climate industry with those in the public and private sectors seeking to mitigate and manage the risks of extreme weather and climate change, and to understand the opportunities. Focused on Asia, Africa and the Pacific Island regions, it has taken place annually in Singapore since 2014. In 2017, companies and decision makers attended from some 44 countries.

The show will again feature Special Sessions on Public-Private Sector co-operation sponsored by the World Bank and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction & Recovery. For 2018, InterMET will be acompanied by a new launch, InterFLOOD Asia, which will focus on the management and mitigation of weather and related flood hazards.

Who will attend?

The event targets operations directors, meteorological officers, forecasters, senior scientists and director-generals from national and international weather services, as well as key decision-makers from weather-sensitive businesses, including agriculture, energy, transport and other areas of public and private enterprise.

Visit the event websites: http://www.intermet.asia/ and http://www.interflood.asia

To book conference places, visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/intermet-asia-interflood-asia-conference-registration-38804373927


Cover photo by Koon Boh Goh/Pixabay (public domain): Singapore Marina.
COP23 roundup: The outcomes and implications for climate adaptation

COP23 roundup: The outcomes and implications for climate adaptation

By Elisa Jiménez Alonso

In the early hours of Saturday morning, the official UN climate talks came to an end. Proceedings closed with a traditional Fijian song, Isa Lei, marking the end of the small island nation’s COP presidency. The negotiations did not close on a spectacular note, as was the case in 2015 when the Paris Agreement was signed, but that does not mean that nothing was achieved in Bonn. What many thought would be an event defined by the current US government’s announcement to step away from the Paris Agreement, turned out a little more positive.

New platforms for gender action, indigenous peoples, and oceans

This was the first COP chaired by a small-island state, which provided such nations a platform to highlight their challenges and inform discussions. With a strong focus on social issues, COP23 saw the establishment of the Gender Action Plan, highlighting role of women in climate action and promoting gender equality in the process, and the Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform, which will support the exchange of experience and sharing of best practices on mitigation and adaptation. Fiji also launched the Ocean Pathway Partnership to integrate oceans more into the UNFCCC process.

Progress outside of the formal process

This year, significant progress was made outside of the official COP negotiations. This is important as it clearly signals that climate action is accelerating outside of governmental processes.

COP23 saw the establishment of the US Climate Action Center, an initiative by US American states, cities, a handful of US senators, businesses, colleges and universities, and non-profits who are committed to climate action regardless of the current White House position on climate change. ECO, the COP newsletter by Climate Action Network International said “the delegation represents a country whose people are deeply committed to climate action.

Current California Governor Jerry Brown and United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change Mike Bloomberg presented the first report of their initiative ‘America’s Pledge’, which was launched this year in July. The report communicates to the international community the scope and scale of non-federal climate action in the United States following the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. It clearly shows the amount of public support for climate action in the USA.

More specific to adaptation and climate risk was the launch of the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA). The centre, which Acclimatise is a founding member of, wants to accelerate climate adaptation by mobilising and convening the global adaptation community to recognize, build and promote excellence among all relevant stakeholder groups around the world.

Furthermore, the European Investment Bank announced it would start screening all of its investments for climate risks using Acclimatise’s Aware tool.

Tensions over pre-2020 action and finance

One area of conflict that emerged in the first week of the talks was the issue of pre-2020 climate action. Developing countries were concerned that rich countries would not meet their commitments they made under the Paris Agreement, for the period to 2020. One of the main issues was the agreed $100 billion per year in climate finance up to 2020, which developed countries have not delivered. While little substantive progress was made on this issue, developing countries succeeded in getting pre-2020 ambitions and implementation included in the COP23 decision text, which states that they are “of utmost importance”. These discussions will also be included in the so-called ‘Talanoa Dialogue’, a one-off process in 2018 to take stock of climate action.

Another issue on climate adaptation finance concerned the Adaptation Fund. There was disagreement over whether the fund, serves the Paris Agreement or not. The fund, was established in 2001 to finance adaptation projects in the developing country Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (the deal struck in 1997 committing developed nations to cut emissions up to 2020). Many argue that for the fund to keep political importance it should serve the newer Paris Agreement. Finally, it was decided that the fund ‘shall’ serve the Paris Agreement, expressing a strong intention but not fully committing to it.

Finally, the Green Climate Fund (GCF) put a strong focus on adaptation during COP23. Following a surge in requests for GCF support, they want to make access to climate adaptation finance easier with a suite of tools including Acclimatise’s GCF proposal toolkit.

Loss and damage – where will the finance come from?

Loss and damage is a historically thorny subject at the UN climate talks, but it was acknowledged in the Paris Agreement and is emerging as “the third pillar of international climate policy”. However, it currently has no sources of finance; an issue that was raised again this year and got postponed to 2019. Within the UNFCCC, loss and damage is dealt with through the Warsaw International Mechanism, which has its next review coming up in 2019. Shifting the discussion to 2019 has been described as “wholly inappropriate” by some experts. Countries agreed to hold further talks, known as the Suva Expert Dialogue, in 2018. The hope is that this will lay the foundations for delivering finance to climate-vulnerable countries where climate-related loss and damage will be most severe.

On a more positive note, the InsuResilience Global Partnership for Climate and Disaster Risk Finance and Insurance Solutions was launched during the second week of COP23. The initiative aims to provide insurance to 400 million poor and vulnerable people by 2020. “The Global Partnership is a practical response to the needs of those who suffer loss because of climate change, and I am very proud that it has happened under Fiji’s Presidency of COP. At the same time, it is a means of preparing for a more resilient form of development for those who will have to adapt to the great challenge of climate change,” said COP23 President and Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama.

The year ahead

2018 will be an important test for the Paris Agreement, as Parties will have to complete the work on the agreed rulebook and complete the global stocktaking under the Talanoa dialogue. Finally, in October, the IPCC will issue its special 1.5 °C report with the aim of strengthening the global response to climate change. COP24 is set to take place in Katowice, Poland from 3-14 December 2018.


Cover photo by UNFCCC (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0): President of COP 23, CMP 13, CMA 1-2 hosts a meeting with Heads of State and Government, the Secretary General of the United Nations and the Executive Secretary UNFCCC
COP23: Call for donors to set targets for amount of funding that reaches the local level

COP23: Call for donors to set targets for amount of funding that reaches the local level

By Will Bugler

Donors and international finance partners should set voluntary targets, and track the amount of climate finance that reaches the local level. This was the suggestion made by Michelle Winthrop, climate change policy lead at the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, at the Development and Climate (D&C) Days at COP23 last weekend. The call for action came after research from the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) estimates that only around 11% of funds allocated to climate adaptation, make it to projects at the local level.

IIED’s assessment puts forward several reasons why climate funds are not reaching ground-level initiatives. These include the investment strategies of climate funds which prioritise large-scale results from large-scale projects; the higher transaction costs involved with small-scale projects which can put investors off; risk averse funding strategies; too little support for building local capacity to manage funds; co-financing requirements that hinder local ownership; and poor enforcement of policies for community engagement.

The proposal on targets for local climate adaptation finance was just one of a host of recommendations emanating from the lively discussions that took place at the D&C days, event that takes place each year on the middle weekend of the COP climate talks. This year those who ventured across the Rhine from the UN negotiating centre, were treated to interactive sessions on climate finance, private sector engagement, the value of local knowledge, and how to create downward accountability of climate adaptation.

Supply chain climate resilience

Picking one’s way through the packed D&C Days programme is not easy, with parallel sessions running throughout the day. Selected highlights included a facilitated discussion on resilience to company supply chains, with contributions from Farm Africa’s, Director of Research and Development, Yvan Biot; Diane Holdorf, Chief Sustainability Officer at Kellogg and Company; and Makhegu Mabunda, Sustainability specialist at Woolworths, South Africa.

It was encouraging to hear from both Kellogg’s and Woolworths that they were actively taking steps to assess the climate risks to their supply chains, working with smallholder farmers to improve the reliability of their supplies. It was clear that they recognised climate risk as an issue of business continuity. Ms Mabunda also was frank in admitting that the many in the private sector are prepared to show willing to increase supply chain resilience but that they “don’t have all the answers, and need to work with development and climate specialists in order to get the best outcomes”.

Tracking public expenditure on climate change adaptation

Another session that caught the imagination of a large number of delegates, was a discussion co-hosted by Action on Climate Today (ACT), Oxford Policy Management (OPM) and IIED, which presented three frameworks for assessing, tracking and calculating the benefit of climate spending at the local level in countries in South East Asia.

One such method was the Financing Framework for Resilient Growth (FFGR) which outlines a method for assessing the amount of money being attributed to climate change in government budgets. It assesses the ‘climate relevance’ of the spending, and helps to track the money from the national to local level. In doing so the FFGR might help governments better identify gaps in adaptation funding in important sectors of the economy, and improve the efficacy of resilience planning.

Heard across the river

The recommendations from the D&C days were captured in typical style by sketch artist extraordinaire, Jorge Martin. The collective wisdom of all those that participated, as captured by Jorge, made it across the river and into the negotiations, providing the background to discussions on climate finance.


The key messages from the D&C Days 2017 have been helpfully distilled here.

Cover photo by Simon Anderson.
EBRD & Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation join forces to strengthen financial sector resilience

EBRD & Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation join forces to strengthen financial sector resilience

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) is partnering with the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) in a joint initiative to help strengthen the resilience of the financial sector to the impacts of climate change.

Investors and businesses are becoming increasingly aware of the need to understand and manage the risks associated with climate change. In order to explore options for addressing these issues, the EBRD and GCECA will organise a conference entitled “Towards a Resilient Financial Sector: Disclosing Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities”, to be held at the EBRD’s London Headquarters on 31 May 2018.

The conference will bring together the financial, technical and policy perspectives to shape market action on climate resilience. The focus will be on improving financial sector awareness of climate risks and their impacts on investments, as well as facilitating the emergence of climate risk and resilience metrics, and identifying ways on which investors and businesses can integrate climate change intelligence into their business strategies and investment planning.

Announcing the cooperation Josué Tanaka of EBRD said: “We are very pleased to partner with the GCECA, the first international institution with a specific focus on climate change adaptation. Building climate resilient economies requires broad market action by businesses and investors, alongside effective government policies. We see great opportunities for working with the GCECA and a wider range of other stakeholders to enable businesses and investors to realise the value that can be created through building climate resilience.”

“We are grateful that the Paris Agreement has put Climate Adaptation on a par with mitigation but there is a long way to go. Understanding Climate Adaptation is crucial if we want to put paper into practice.” Christiaan Wallet, Operations Director of GCECA

The announcement was made today in Bonn at the COP23 climate conference which this year is focussing on the implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. The EBRD is organising four panels on key climate issues and Bank representatives are also taking part in many more events.

The EBRD is a major investor in climate finance in many of the 38 emerging economies where it works, a driving force in energy efficiency projects, a pioneer in the development of renewable energy sources and an increasingly important player in adaptation to climate change, having signed almost 180 climate resilience investment since 2011. Under its Green Economy Transition (GET) approach, the EBRD aims to dedicate 40 per cent of its annual investment to green finance by 2020 and is well on the way to achieving this objective.

The Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation helps countries, institutions and businesses to adapt to a warming climate, which is increasing the frequency of natural disasters and causing economic disruptions. It is bringing together international partners, including leading knowledge institutes, businesses, NGOs, local and national governments, international organisations and financial institutions. A technical secretariat has been created and funded by the EBRD.

As member of the technical secretariat, Acclimatise will be closely involved in this project working together with EBRD and GCECA.


Cover photo by Reginar on Unsplash: Station Utrecht Centraal, Utrecht, Netherlands
UN Climate Summit COP23: Wide support for new global climate adaptation centre

UN Climate Summit COP23: Wide support for new global climate adaptation centre

By GCECA

The Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) launches with speakers including Mr. Erik Solheim, Mrs. Noaka Ishii, Mr. Ovais Sarmad and Mrs. Cora van Nieuwenhuizen. In the opening address, Mrs. Nieuwenhuizen, Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management of the Netherlands, underscored the importance of international collaboration and knowledge exchange in order to improve our resilience against the changing climate.

“There are many more examples of adaptation. Like the mangroves being replanted along the coast of Indonesia. Or the way the World Meteorological Organization is using big data to inform African farmers by text message when to plant and when to harvest their crops. All these examples, all this knowledge is worth spreading all over the world. And that’s exactly what the Global Centre will do.” –Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen

Speaking ahead of the launch, Operations Director, Christiaan Wallet linked the demand for GCECA with the Paris Agreement.

“We are grateful that the Paris Agreement has put climate adaptation on a par with mitigation but there is a long way to go. Understanding climate adaptation is crucial if we want to put paper into practice.”–Christiaan Wallet, Operations Director of GCECA

GCECA accelerates climate adaptation by mobilising and convening the global adaptation community to recognize, build and promote excellence among all relevant stakeholder groups around the world. GCECA focuses its activities on those areas where acceleration is most needed: where action is most urgently required and where this is complementary to the work of others.

“The effective engagement of all stakeholders and the management of knowledge for climate adaptation is vital in supporting all adaptation activities”. –Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary UNFCCC

Worldwide knowledge network
The risk of natural disasters and other problems ensuing from climate change is increasing all over the world. GCECA will be supporting countries, organisations, and businesses with knowledge and advice in the field of climate adaptation, in order to better prepare them for tackling the impact of climate change. The centre will amass an ever-expanding network of international partners, among which leading knowledge institutes, businesses, NGOs, local and national governments, international organisations, and the financial sector.

Previously at COP23, GCECA supported the launch of UN Environment’s Adaptation Gap Report and held a side event, with Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre regarding measuring excellence in Climate Adaptation.

Looking beyond COP23, The Centre’s next engagement will be on 31 May 2018, co-hosting a conference in London, with EBRD (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development): ” Towards a Resilient Financial Sector: Disclosing Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities”, on physical climate risk management and climate resilience in the finance & business communities.

Participants

Acclimatise is one of the GCECA partners. John Firth, CEO of Acclimatise, is the chair of the Preparation Group which has been working over the last nine months to set the GCECA up, develop its work plan, engage with partners, and prepare for launch at COP.  He will also be chairing an Implementation Group which will assist the Centre during its first year of operations.

The other parties participating in the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation include the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, UN Environment, Japan National Institute for Environmental Studies, Adaptation Fund, Acclimatise, African Climate Policy Centre, CARE International, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, Centre of Excellence for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, Centro Regional de Cambio Climatico y Toma de Decisiones, Uruguay, Climate-KIC, Climate Policy Initiative, Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research/Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security, C40 Cities, Delft University of Technology, Delta Alliance, Deltares, ECORYS, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Fundación Avina, Global Environment Facility, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, International Centre for Climate Change and Development, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, International Development Research Centre Canada, Local Governments for Sustainability, Munich Climate Insurance Initiative, Municipality of Groningen, Municipality of Rotterdam, National Institute for Environmental Studies Japan, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, SloCat Partnership on Sustainable Low-Carbon Transport, Stockholm Environment Institute, The Nature Conservancy, Technical University Delft, University of Cape Town / African Climate and Development Initiative, UN Capital Development Fund, UNEP-DTU, UN Environment, United Nations Development Programme, United Nations University, Wageningen University and Research Centre, World Meteorological Organization, World Resources Institute, World Wildlife Fund, 100 Resilient Cities.

The Centre will be hosted by the municipality of Rotterdam and Groningen.

https://twitter.com/RCClimate/status/930439736216440832

 


More information: www.gceca.org.

Cover photo by Partnership on Sustainable Low Carbon Transport: Impression from the GCECA launch event at COP23.
COP23 first week roundup: Push towards loss and damage action but stagnation on pre-2020 climate issues

COP23 first week roundup: Push towards loss and damage action but stagnation on pre-2020 climate issues

By Elisa Jiménez Alonso

The first week at COP23 in Bonn is already behind us. What was supposed to be a boring, technocratic COP, got going with a surprising sense of urgency with negotiators seemingly spurred on by UN warnings that national pledges in made so far would only deliver one third of the emissions cuts to reach the Paris target. But beyond the carbon targets, discussions continued on a host of adaptation and resilience issues. As delegates get ready for the second week of negotiations (and the inevitable late nights that it brings), we take a look at what has happened so far:

Non-state climate action

Last week saw the establishment of the US Climate Action Center, an initiative by US American states, cities, a handful of US senators, businesses, colleges and universities, and non-profits who are committed to climate action regardless of the current White House position on climate change. ECO, the COP newsletter by Climate Action Network International said “the delegation represents a country whose people are deeply committed to climate action.

ECO and others report that the decision over the inclusion of pre-2020 climate action in the COP23 agenda is stagnating as developed countries claim the matter could be discussed elsewhere. A 2012 agreement of developed nations stated that they would cut emissions at least 18% compared to 1990 levels. To this day, however, most have not even ratified the agreement.

Loss and damage

With Fiji holding the presidency, it comes as no surprise that loss and damage is an especially important item on the agenda. The devastating climate disasters around the world in 2017 are serving as evidence of how important the permanent inclusion of loss and damage is at the UN climate talks. There are calls for the Warsaw Mechanism (WIM) to start moving beyond building “knowledge and collaboration” on the issue and toward mobilising finance and action to address climate-related loss and damage.

There has been considerable progress on loss and damage over the last decade, and although there are some reports that delegates from developed countries are trying to keep the finance issue out of discussions on the WIM, it does have a clear mandate to enhance, facilitate, mobilise and secure finance for loss and damage. It certainly seems that the hard yards on this issue are still ahead of us.

Adaptation funding

During last week’s opening sessions, Germany announced they were committing €50 million (US$58 m) in new funding to the UN Adaptation Fund, which distributes finance to climate change adaptation and resilience building projects in developing nations. The commitment gets the fund nearly 75% of its US$80 million goal for 2017.

It will be interesting to see this week if the climate talks will do anything to address the current imbalance on adaptation finance, and if improvements will be made to the way commitments are tracked. This will also be important for the 2020 climate finance goal of US$100 billion per year (for both adaptation and mitigation), the fulfilment of which is seen as a vital to enhance trust and cooperation between the developed and developing nations.

The importance of adaptation finance and support from developed nations was further underlined by a report completed by the Fijian government and the World Bank which concluded the island nation needed US$4.5 billion to reach its development objectives in the face of climate change. This amount is equivalent to Fiji’s entire gross domestic product over the next 10 years.

A focus on health

The World Health Organisation and the UN Climate Change secretariat drafted an initiative together with Fiji to protect people from small island nations from the health impacts of climate change. The plan wants to build capacity in such nations through enhancing knowledge, resources and technology to increase their healthcare resilience. Health projects currently only receive about 1.5% of adaptation finance, but people living in small island developing states are faced with severe health risks due to extreme weather events, rising sea levels and increasing risk of infectious diseases.

It will be interesting to see what the negotiations bring over the next few days as COP23 comes to its end. Will there be progress on the fine print of the Paris Agreement? Will loss and damage make another leap? Will parties agree on pre-2020 action? This and more in our final COP23 round up next week!


Cover photo by Wolkenkratzer/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0): ‘Bonn-Zone’ in landscape park Rheinaue near river Rhine in Bonn, a few days before the begin of United Nations Climate Change Conference, November 2017 in Germany. White tents and temporary structures within green trees at a little lake, near one of water recycling and wastewater treatment plants in Bonn.
Launch event at COP23: Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation

Launch event at COP23: Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation

We are proud to invite you to the launch event of the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA). GCECA accelerates climate adaptation by recognising, building and promoting excellence among all relevant stakeholder groups around the world. Acclimatise is a partner of the GCECA.

GCECA focuses its activities on those areas where acceleration is most needed: where action is most urgently required and where this is complementary to the work of others. It is an independent organisation, working across the Global North and South, with offices in the Netherlands. GCECA was initiated by UN Environment, the Governments of the Netherlands, Japan and the Philippines, and has established partnerships with over 50 international organisations, NGOs, governments, financial institutions, knowledge institutions and businesses to jointly accelerate climate adaptation. GCECA is the world’s most comprehensive global and cross-stakeholder partnership on Climate Adaptation. All partners committed to contribute actively, some of them by funding specific activities.

When: Tuesday, November 14, 3:00-4:00 PM

Location: Room 2309, located on the 23rd floor of Langer Eugen (the high rise building on the UN Campus, which is part of the Bula Zone)

Programme:

  • Opening Speech Mrs. Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management of The Netherlands
  • Moderated high- level conversation about the need for effective climate adaptation, with Mr. Solheim, Executive Director UN Environment, Mrs. Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, Dutch Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management, Mrs. Naoko Ishii, CEO Global Environment Facility and Mr. Yasuaki Hijioka, Director of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan)
  • Moderated discussion: Dr. Matthias Garschagen, speaking on behalf of institute Director and vice-Rector of Munich Climate Insurance Initiative (MCII) – United Nations University (UNU); Josué Tanaka, Managing Director for Energy Efficiency & Climate Change, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development; Mr. Elhadj As Sy, Secretary General International Federation of Red Cross
  • Possibility for short interviews

For further information about GCECA, please visit the website www.gceca.org.

Registration contact:

Members of the press have to register to attend the launch event. Please send a registration email to Karim Mostafi, press officer of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management: karim.mostafi@minienm.nl. Please include your full name, publication/station and mobile phone number.

Acclimatise, Deltares and 5Oceans working on Dubai Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Acclimatise, Deltares and 5Oceans working on Dubai Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Recently, Acclimatise, Deltares, and 5Oceans received the assignment to support the Emirate of Dubai in the creation of a climate adaptation strategy. This challenging project is coordinated by the Environment Department of Dubai Municipality. Dubai is an active member of the global C40 City Network.

In a world where the risk of climate change is becoming more overwhelming, it is in Dubai’s interests to identify appropriate strategies to adapt to climate change to ensure the Emirate continues to thrive in the future. A climate adaptation strategy therefore forms part of the foundation for Dubai’s high standard in economic, social and environmental targets and aspirations.

The primary aim of the adaptation strategy is to prevent negative impacts on sectors by presenting a guideline and actions that diminish risks of climate change. Another important objective is to identify actions, with high feasibility, broad support and in synergy with the ambitions and goals of sectors (e.g. tourism, energy, water, infrastructure, industry, real estate, nature preservation etc.).


Cover photo by Tim Reckman (CC BY-SA 3.0): Skyline of Downtown Dubai with Burj Khalifa from a Helicopter.
Acclimatise launches new website with improved user experience

Acclimatise launches new website with improved user experience

By Elisa Jiménez Alonso

It’s been a long time in the making but it is finally here: Our new website!

For several months, we have been working on modernising our online presence. With this new website, we hope to provide our clients and visitors an improved user experience. We have simplified the design and structure of the website, and drop-down menus help users navigate through all its pages.

The search function, currently located on the news site and within all the news categories, offers ample results and makes browsing through our articles and knowledge resources much easier. However, due to the number of articles and reports we have uploaded throughout the past years (almost 3000 items!), there will be a transition period during which this new website will not have the complete contents on it. We will continuously migrate old content to our new platform throughout the coming months, but in the meantime all users are welcome to browse our former website, which has been archived and can be accessed here: archive.acclimatise.uk.com

The new website will be a living project and we will update it regularly as time goes on. It offers a lot of flexibility and the opportunity to constantly improve our users’ experience.

For now, we sincerely hope you enjoy our new website!


Cover photo from Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).