The heat is on: Northern Hemisphere experiences sweltering summer temperatures

The heat is on: Northern Hemisphere experiences sweltering summer temperatures

By Elisa Jiménez Alonso

Large parts of the Northern Hemisphere are currently experiencing unusually high temperatures giving us a taste of what climate change looks like in our day-to-day lives, and highlighting the need for adaptation.

Worldwide heat

Temperature records have been breaking across the United Kingdom, Glasgow for example had its hottest day ever recorded with 31.9C, and Scotland broke its temperature record with 33.2C in Motherwell. While these temperatures are not nearly as bad as elsewhere, they are out of the ordinary and are causing infrastructure problems.

Buckled rails and signal failures have led to widespread cancellations and delays. Additionally, the Met Office has activated a Level 3 – Heatwave Action across southern, central, and western England, encouraging people to check on any elderly family members or friends and other vulnerable persons.

In Canada, where Montreal broke its temperature record with 36.6C, up to 54 deaths have been linked to the heatwave in southern Quebec. Temperatures rose to 35C with high humidity and a smog advisory. Most victims were over 50 years old.

Most frightening of all, however, the temperature in the town of Quriyat in Oman never dropped below 42.6C for a full 24 hours in June.

Trends of the new millennium

The warming trend is clear, according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), all 18 years of the 21st century have been among the 19 warmest on record with 2016 being the hottest year ever recorded. The five hottest years ever recorded have occurred since 2010.

Many countries have experienced what these trends can lead to. The notorious 2003 European heatwave is estimated to have caused anywhere between 20,000 and 70,000 premature deaths. In 2006, California saw a ten-day heatwave that was linked to 140 deaths. In Canada, the summer heatwave of 2010, one of the hottest on record, killed about 280 people.

A hot new normal without political will to change

The warming trends are clearly linked to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. While renewable energy use is growing, 80% of global energy use is from fossil fuels. The transition to a low-carbon economy is proving to be a slow one, thus, adaptation to climate change will be, and already is, essential.

National infrastructure, especially related to water supply, will need a lot of attention, as will housing standards. But, as we are seeing in the UK right now, transportation will need to be updated as well to deal with higher temperatures. There are also considerations for national healthcare and land management – adaptation truly needs to happen across all sectors.

However, as the political climate in the Northern Hemisphere heats up as well, climate change is rarely top of the agenda. This, of course, is a major mistake, as climate change will put even more pressure on any problems we are already facing undermining prosperity, progress, and economic growth.


Photo by Garry Knight/Flickr (CC BY 2.0): Summer in Regent’s Park.

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